GTG Workshop: Create Cute Creatures with Sophie Daly


In today’s workshop, artist Sophie Daly shows you how to make adorable little creatures out of egg cartons. You have probably have been baking lots of treats with family recently. Put those egg cartons to good use by creating a turtle, ladybird or bee to play with!

Turtles, ladybirds and bees are so important to our planet. We can show them our appreciation through art and by protecting them.



You will need:

  • Egg carton(s)
  • A soft ball of some sort, out of clay or plastic etc
  • Cotton buds
  • Cocktail sticks
  • Paint brushes
  • Water for brushes
  • Paint

You can download a worksheet for each creature too! Which is your favourite?

You can learn more about ladybirds here

Learn about why we need to protect turtles here

And here are some top tips on how to help our bees!

Other ways to help the planet:

Let’s try and stamp out single use plastics. Try walking if you can, or go by bike! A better planet means a better future for all creatures great and small.

And of course, instead of throwing things away once they’re empty, use them to make art!

Supported by Community Foundation NI

GTG Workshop: Create an artist’s notebook!


In today’s virtual workshop, artist Sophie Daly will show you how to create your own beautiful and unique artist’s notebook – every artist needs one!

The emphasis today is on recycled materials. Be creative with what you have around you, and don’t let anything go to waste, nothing is ever useless! Finding creative ways to reduce what we throw away is a brilliant habit to help our planet.



You will need:

  • Cardboard
  • Scrap paper
  • Old books/newspapers/leaflets etc
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Needle and thread
  • Something pokey, like a screwdriver
  • A ruler and pencil

Many artists are now working with recycled or more sustainable materials, and using their art to draw attention to climate change and the need to look after our planet.

What else do you have that instead of being thrown away, could be re-used to make art? Send us your ideas!

GTG Workshop: Create a sun collage with Chloe Morrison


Today’s GTG Workshop is a colourful and fun activity for a cold and grey day – making a beautiful abstract sun collage, inspired by legendary African-American artist and teacher Alma Thomas. Chloe Morrison guides you through step-by-step, and you can download the worksheet too!

You will need:

  • A sheet of white paper or card
  • A pencil
  • A ruler
  • Glue or Pritt Stick
  • A pair of suitable scissors
  • Coloured paper (alternatively, you can use paint sample cards, scraps of fabric, or magazine clippings)
  • A circular or cylindrical object to trace around, e.g., a tin, jar, glass, bottle or vase

About the artist

Alma Woodsey Thomas (1891 – 1978) was an African American abstract painter. Her works are renowned for their distinctive brushstrokes and exuberant use of colour. Alma Thomas applied vivid shades of paint to her canvases in short, precise patches, creating irregular, striking patterns. She would often arrange these marks in vertical stripes or concentric circles. 

In Thomas’s circular works, rings of colours appear to radiate out from a central point, like rays of light emanating from the sun.

Alma Thomas, The Eclipse, 1970, acrylic on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the artist, 1978.40.3

You can see more of Alma Thomas’s paintings on the Smithsonian American Art Museum website.

Funded by Community Foundation NI.

GTG Workshop: Draw like Yayoi Kusama with Chloe Morrison


Today’s brand new GTG Workshop explores the fantastical, colourful art of iconic Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. She is known as the ‘princess of polka dots’, because although she makes many different kinds of art, from sculpture, installation, paintings and drawings, they always feature lots and lots and LOTS of dots!



Kusama was born in Japan in 1929, and while she was still a child she began to experience vivid hallucinations which included vast fields of flowers like dots. The very earliest work that she made using dots was a drawing of a Japanese woman in a kimono, believed to be her mother, covered by dots – created when Kusama was only 10 years old.

She moved to America in the 1950s and became an important part of the avant-garde movement in New York. She was very productive over the next decade but because of widespread sexism in the art world, she struggled to gain widespread recognition and success. Kusama also had to watch some male artists get success and acclaim from copying her ideas – including Andy Warhol! Understandably, this was extremely frustrating and depressing for Kusama, and she moved back to Japan and didn’t make any new art for several years.

But in the late 1970’s she returned to making art from her new home in a hospital in Japan. Then in 1989 a very important exhibition looking back at her work and her huge influence on other artists was held in New York at the Center for International Contemporary Arts, organised by curator Alexandra Munroe which helped to bring Yayoi Kusama’s work back into the spotlight.


Yayoi Kusama at work in her studio, in front of her painting The Moving Moment When I Went to the Universe. Photograph: Yayoi Kusama Studio

Now, Yayoi Kusama she is now the world’s biggest-selling female artist, her work is instantly recognisable worldwide, and an entire museum dedicated to her art opened in Tokyo in 2017! And she still uses DOTS!

Singapore Biennale on Orchard Road, Singapore August 2006, by Sengkang used under Creative Commons

GTG Workshops are funded by Community Foundation NI.

GTG Workshop: Origami Bear with Paul Mulgrew!


In today’s bear-illiant new workshop, artist Paul Mulgrew shows you how to design, draw, create and colour your very own smiling Origami Bear!

WHAT YOU NEED:

  • One square sheet of white paper. (Plus one extra scrap sheet to protect the table.)
  • Crayons: Brown, Red, Black.
  • One black marker.

Origami is the traditional Japanese art of creating mini-sculptures by folding a flat, square sheet of paper – no scissors or glue required. The crane is one of the most famous designs, and one of the oldest known books about origami from 1797, called Hiden senbazuru origata (The Secret of Folding 1,000 Paper Cranes), contains instructions for making 49 different kinds of crane.

But origami is still being taken to new levels by contemporary artists – like this incredible life-size elephant created by artist Sipho Mabona from a single sheet of paper!


Or these elaborate paper sculptures designed using computational origami created by Professor Jun Mitani.


So, you can see that once you master the basics with our Origami Bear, the potential for new ideas from a historic tradition is vast and exciting.

Have fun folding, and please send us pictures of your creations!


Funded by Community Foundation NI

GTG Workshop: Draw Pizza Steve with Paul Mulgrew


Today’s brand new workshop will show you how to draw and colour in a fun cartoon character called Pizza Steve!

Belfast based artist and designer Paul Mulgrew works in digital media, creative writing, print and film, including the wonderful short film Zipper which has been selected for screening at the Raindance Film Festival 2020.



WHAT YOU NEED FOR PIZZA STEVE:

• One sheet of white paper.
• Crayons: Orange, Red, Black, Dark Yellow, Yellow.
• One black marker.

You can download the worksheet with full instructions here!


GTG Workshops are funded by Community Foundation NI.

GTG Workshop: Open Processing with Robin Price


In part 2 of his workshops on using computer coding to get creative, Robin Price takes us through how open processing works.

Once you have the basics of this down, the potential for making all kids of new art is really boundless!



Robin uses technology to create music and soundscapes as well as visual art, and to push the boundaries of our ideas about what different technologies can do. What do you think our machines and devices could do that would be new and different? Send us your pictures and ideas!


GTG Workshops are funded by the Community Foundation NI

GTG FLASHBACK: SPLATTERED!


In August 2008 the Golden Thread Gallery hosted a ground-breaking participatory art project called Splattered. The project showcased range of contemporary urban artforms, with events run by the Trans Urban Arts Academy and aimed to encourage innovative crossovers between street art and more established forms of contemporary visual culture.

Splattered was an ambitious project combining contemporary urban art forms such as graffiti, VJing and low-tech filmmaking, with the added attraction of a paint-bombing event that linked with an exhibition of new work by Carlos Llavata: an internationally renowned artist & explosives expert, known for using fireworks and other kinds of explosives to create artworks that reflect on the human condition and the tension that lies between creativity and destruction.

It was an unbelievable opportunity to paint bomb an art gallery and join forces with an international explosives expert / artist. Participants listened to the sound of paint splatter and the newest beats as they took turns exploding with Carlos!



Splattered included:

Bodyscapes – an exhibition of new work by Carlos Llavata (Spain) connecting audio-visual projections with live actions and dramatic undertones.

Graffiti – Filth & Duncan Ross with the Splat Pack transformed the walls of the Gallery using graffiti techniques.


And now… it’s your turn!


CREATE YOUR OWN SPLATTER ART AT HOME

There’s no getting around it, splatter art can be SUPER messy… but that’s part of the fun! So, you need to do a bit of preparation, and definitely ask a grown-up for permission and some help!

The very best way to do it is outside so you can spread your paper out on the ground. If you are inside, paint in a space that you can clean up easily – avoid anywhere with wallpaper or carpets – and wear an apron or old clothes.

The great thing about splatter is that you don’t even need a paintbrush… there are so many possibilities.

It’s really all about THE FLICK! If you’re indoors, use a smaller flick of your wrist. But if you’re outside, go big and use your arms!

You need:

  • Runny paint in pots (or cups or yoghurt cartons or bowls)
  • Paper (or cardboard or an old t-shirt or an unfolded cereal box)
  • A paintbrush (or a spoon or an old toothbrush)

Are you ready? Ok!

Dip your brush or spoon into the paint then FLICK your wrist to splatter the paint across the paper!

Keep splattering with different colours. Try splattering close to the paper, and then further away, for different effects.

Leave your picture lying flat until the paint is dry… unless you want to experiment and see what happens if you don’t!

SHARE YOUR SPLATTER ART WITH US! Email pictures to info@gtgallery.co.uk

GTG Workshops: Easy Weaving with Simon Mills


Today’s online workshop by artist and photographer Simon Mills shows you how to do simple weaving using paper. Once you get the hang of the technique, you can create baskets, placemats, decorations or even very funky headwear!

With a little bit of help, this is an activity for all ages to enjoy.



Did you know that basket-weaving is one of the most ancient crafts in human history? Yet there are many artists using the technique today, such as basketry artist Ferne K. Jacobs or Anna and the Willow who weaves willow rods to create incredible life-size sculptures.

Huntress (c) Anna and the Willow

We’d love to see pictures of your woven creations! Send them to us at info@gtgallery.co.uk


GTG Workshops are funded by Community Foundation NI

GTG Workshops: Salt dough modelling clay with Simon Mills


Today’s online workshop by artist and photographer Simon Mills shows you how to make your own brilliant salt dough modelling clay using basic household ingredients… And it features a very special and adorable guest artist! With a little bit of help, this is an activity for all ages to enjoy!



You can use salt dough to make ornaments, jewellery, picture-frames, the initials of your name, model cars or animals – the possibilities are endless. Once it’s baked, it can last for years if you look after it carefully.

Here’s the worksheet with instructions that you can download and print.

We’d love to see pictures of your salt dough creations! Send them to us at info@gtgallery.co.uk


GTG Workshops are funded by Community Foundation NI