‘Not Alone’ touring exhibition now in Bologna


The Golden Thread Gallery’s unique touring exhibition ‘Not Alone’ arrived in Bologna on 30th August. Curator Chiara Matteucci unpacked and installed the artworks in her home, and has been sharing her iteration of the exhibition online for the past week on social media. She’s also shared her own perspective on the project, and where she believes it fits in the field of exhibition-making. Chiara writes:

“The title ‘Not Alone” comes from a Police song, Message in a Bottle. During the quarantine, how many of us experienced a sense of alienation without being lost on a remote island? That nostalgia for social life, human contact, and the possibility of seeing live artworks, is the emotion that moves the project at its beginning; in parallel with the necessity to create something different, able to re-enact old mechanisms and to get people used to the wait, to their right of taking their time to do everything, even experience an exhibition.”


Sign of Distress, Version 1. Black Lives Matter March. Washington DC. June 4th 2020 & Sign of Distress, Version 2. Black Lives Matter March. Washington DC. June 4th 2020 2020 Joy Gerrard, with To think about things together that appear to be separate 2020 John Rainey

“Almost all of the artists involved decided to create something concrete, more traditional (if we can still use this term), albeit all of them were free to create whatever they want, except for one condition: the artwork had to be able to travel in a bottle. The fact that the artists decided to use traditional media, from sculptures to paintings, to printed photographs, make me think… Is this a coincidence? Or is it a stance, a necessity to take a step back from the digital world? If it’s the latter, is it correct to take that distance?”


Sutured 2020 Sharon Kelly

“The migration of the Art World online has separated intellectuals in two currents: those who are pro digital and those against, who consider the Internet as a short-term solution.  But during this unusual period, we’ve all been grateful to the web and its potentialities. All the art members, from institutions to artists and curators, have tried to exploit as much as they can the digital world to keep themself (and us) alive. Instagram takeovers, podcasts, virtual tours, but also online performances were all been ways to share and make art everywhere. This possibility of being connected with people who comes from the other part of the world, that they might never afford to come overseas to see an exhibition, it is definitely something that we can’t neglect, and it is, in my opinion, the best quality of the Web.”


Disappear 2020 Megan Doherty [on wall] with Through A Pane H91X6XN – BT180AJ 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 14, 19, 20 2020 Ailbhe Greaney [on table, left] and Glass Tower 2020 Graham Gingles

“This democratic aspect of the world wide web, connecting all the public realm with the cultural system – it belongs to the home, too.”

“Before considering it as a cage, the house has been our refuge and sometimes an art space. To demonstrate this, the Art History is full of subversive examples of exhibitions which took place outside the museums and the famous white cube. Digging more, there is a long thread of art exhibitions in houses that starts from 1986 with the famous Chambres d’Amis at Gand, it passed through The Kitchen curated by Olbrist and arrives at nowadays.”


The Second Shift: On Crumbs of Shadow 2020 Clare Gallagher

“If the art system has tried to make Art eternal, neutral, and exclusive, the house gave it back to where it belongs: to the real world. In the house indeed the artworks start to live again, the fruition of them changes and merges with the emotional sphere of the house itself, full of the memories of its owner. Inside the house there are no more hierarchies, it is accessible to everyone; the cultural elite is replaced with the mass. Exactly as the digital realm has done from its beginning, and more and more with the arrival of social media, using its devices to make Art available in a click.”


Kairos 2020 Chloe Austin [on monitor] with
The Second Shift: On Crumbs of Shadow 2020 Clare Gallagher
She is 2020 Chloe Austin
Glass Tower 2020 Graham Gingles

GTG Artists Present: Ursula Burke


The Golden Thread is delighted to continue our series of new short films by artists reflecting on their work with a piece by Irish artist Ursula Burke.

Ursula’s film ‘From Canova to De Chirico’ looks at the integration of the classical and the surreal in her art.



About the Artist

Ursula Burke is an Irish artist who works in a variety of media including Porcelain Sculpture, Embroidery Sculpture and Drawing.

She currently has a solo exhibition at the Ulster Museum titled A False Dawn. She recently undertook an artist residency at Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris and a solo exhibition also titled A False Dawn.

She is winner of the Golden Fleece Award and the Visual Artists Ireland Suki Tea Award – March 2018. She undertook an artist residency and group exhibition titled So It Is with the Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, Jan – April 2017 and was awarded the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, British School at Rome Fellowship in 2014. She is Joint Prize Winner of the Claremorris Open, Ireland 2015. Solo Exhibitions include The Precariat, The RHA Gallery, Dublin 2018; The Precariat, The Dock Arts Centre, Leitrim; Solo representation at Supermarket Art Fair Stockholm by Ormston House Limerick, March 2017; ‘Vestiges’ at Ormston House, Limerick September 2016 & ‘Vestige’ at the Oonagh Young Gallery, Dublin, during May 2016.

She undertook a major solo exhibition titled ‘Hope for a Better Past’ with the MAC Belfast, 2013 and worked with the National Portrait Gallery London on ’National Memories local Stories’ project during the same year. She is an Associate Academician of the Royal Ulster Academy, Belfast, Northern Ireland.


GTG Artists Present is funded by Community Foundation NI

Porcelain Masterclass

Porcelain Masterclass with Ursula Burke at Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast

22 and 23 July
Time: 11am to 5pm, day one and two, with lunch break in between (lunch not provided).
Cost: £80 – includes all materials and firing of one piece.

Make your own piece of surrealist porcelain sculpture. Using the slip cast method, each participant will be encouraged to build a small piece of porcelain sculpture using plaster moulds made by participants. Strange and wonderful sculptures will be encouraged.

Day One – learn how to make two, three and four part plaster moulds. Objects to cast from will be provided.

Day Two – Learn how to slip cast using porcelain slip and plaster moulds made from day one in order to make a piece of porcelain sculpture.

A 50% deposit is required to secure a place. Please contact ursula.burke@gmail.com or 0044 7926806491.

Golden Thread Gallery, 84-94 Great Patrick St, Belfast BT1 2LU
T: +44 28 9033 0920
E: info@gtgallery.co.uk
W: goldenthreadgallery.co.uk