GTG Workshop: Monochrome inspired by Joy Gerrard


Start collecting your paper scraps and junk mail! For today’s GTG virtual Workshop, we are taking inspiration from our current exhibition by artist Joy Gerrard, ‘Put It to the People’.



In this online workshop our Gallery Assistant Katharine Paisley shows you how to recycle scraps and paper from around the house to create your very own monochrome cityscape collage. 

What you will need:

  • Card or paper (black, grey or white)
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Black marker
  • Old newspapers, magazines,  posters,  flyers, leaflets, junk mail (any card/paper/packaging that is going to recycling)

You’ll find this activity and lots more in our new GTG Junior Newsletter! Sign up to our mailing list (at the bottom of this page) to be the first to receive it every month!

‘Not Alone’ continues its journey in Italy


Our exhibition in a bottle is in Rome, installed by curator Manuela Pacella in her home. Manuela has a deep interest in the the history and art of Northern Ireland, since curating the Patria Interiore / Inner Homeland exhibition here at the GTG in 2012, and then being selected in 2013 for the ICI’s Curatorial Intensive at the CCA in Derry and for the International Residency at Flax Art Studios in Belfast.

Manuela documented her version of ‘Not Alone’ on Instagram, and shared her thoughts on having pieces of Belfast with her again. This is her essay about Sharon Kelly‘s ‘Sutured‘ 2020 piece.


“Among the last activities carried out before the lockdown was a studio visit to the British School at Rome at the newly arrived Sharon Kelly, from Belfast, whose light but rather tough sculpture in scrim and red thread I just set up. The anatomical parts remind me of the ones she was drawing at the studio in Rome. […] she spoke of portions of gestures of caring, of caring for each other and I saw so much disease. ‘Sutured’ is now on a small passing way of my house; portions of fabric are connected to each other to form parts of a body through a fiery red thread, at times the same features of arteries; I still see, in that red thread that joins a real suture, a desire to put back together the shards of a vase broken too many years ago. […] My home is now your home. But my home has become sacred since I missed it more than human contact, since I risked seeing it either a few hundred meters away from me, since I know my parents will never see it again, since I decided to take care of it as if it were full of sutures still red, like those of Sharon’s thread, my first artist met after months of forced separation from my previous life and last contact that preceded a global isolation.”

At the end of this week, Manuela will pack the exhibition up and send it on to the next curator – but it’s not going so far this time, just across the city to curator Micol di Veroli!

Follow Not Alone’s journey on our Instagram.

‘Not Alone’ departs for Rome!


Our touring exhibition ‘Not Alone’ has left Bologna, and is on its way to Rome!

Carefully packed up by our first curator Chiara Matteucci, the artworks will now travel 400km across Italy to the home of Manuela Pacella in Rome. Manuela is an independent curator and writer, and she has visited and worked in Northern Ireland many times in the last decade, including guest curating exhibitions in the Golden Thread and at the MAC, Belfast.

We can’t wait to see her interpretation of the exhibition! (And fingers crossed everything arrives in one piece!).

Make sure to follow us on Instagram to see the arrival, unpacking and installation of ‘Not Alone’ in its second show in Italy.


‘Not Alone’ touring exhibition now in Bologna


The Golden Thread Gallery’s unique touring exhibition ‘Not Alone’ arrived in Bologna on 30th August. Curator Chiara Matteucci unpacked and installed the artworks in her home, and has been sharing her iteration of the exhibition online for the past week on social media. She’s also shared her own perspective on the project, and where she believes it fits in the field of exhibition-making. Chiara writes:

“The title ‘Not Alone” comes from a Police song, Message in a Bottle. During the quarantine, how many of us experienced a sense of alienation without being lost on a remote island? That nostalgia for social life, human contact, and the possibility of seeing live artworks, is the emotion that moves the project at its beginning; in parallel with the necessity to create something different, able to re-enact old mechanisms and to get people used to the wait, to their right of taking their time to do everything, even experience an exhibition.”


Sign of Distress, Version 1. Black Lives Matter March. Washington DC. June 4th 2020 & Sign of Distress, Version 2. Black Lives Matter March. Washington DC. June 4th 2020 2020 Joy Gerrard, with To think about things together that appear to be separate 2020 John Rainey

“Almost all of the artists involved decided to create something concrete, more traditional (if we can still use this term), albeit all of them were free to create whatever they want, except for one condition: the artwork had to be able to travel in a bottle. The fact that the artists decided to use traditional media, from sculptures to paintings, to printed photographs, make me think… Is this a coincidence? Or is it a stance, a necessity to take a step back from the digital world? If it’s the latter, is it correct to take that distance?”


Sutured 2020 Sharon Kelly

“The migration of the Art World online has separated intellectuals in two currents: those who are pro digital and those against, who consider the Internet as a short-term solution.  But during this unusual period, we’ve all been grateful to the web and its potentialities. All the art members, from institutions to artists and curators, have tried to exploit as much as they can the digital world to keep themself (and us) alive. Instagram takeovers, podcasts, virtual tours, but also online performances were all been ways to share and make art everywhere. This possibility of being connected with people who comes from the other part of the world, that they might never afford to come overseas to see an exhibition, it is definitely something that we can’t neglect, and it is, in my opinion, the best quality of the Web.”


Disappear 2020 Megan Doherty [on wall] with Through A Pane H91X6XN – BT180AJ 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 14, 19, 20 2020 Ailbhe Greaney [on table, left] and Glass Tower 2020 Graham Gingles

“This democratic aspect of the world wide web, connecting all the public realm with the cultural system – it belongs to the home, too.”

“Before considering it as a cage, the house has been our refuge and sometimes an art space. To demonstrate this, the Art History is full of subversive examples of exhibitions which took place outside the museums and the famous white cube. Digging more, there is a long thread of art exhibitions in houses that starts from 1986 with the famous Chambres d’Amis at Gand, it passed through The Kitchen curated by Olbrist and arrives at nowadays.”


The Second Shift: On Crumbs of Shadow 2020 Clare Gallagher

“If the art system has tried to make Art eternal, neutral, and exclusive, the house gave it back to where it belongs: to the real world. In the house indeed the artworks start to live again, the fruition of them changes and merges with the emotional sphere of the house itself, full of the memories of its owner. Inside the house there are no more hierarchies, it is accessible to everyone; the cultural elite is replaced with the mass. Exactly as the digital realm has done from its beginning, and more and more with the arrival of social media, using its devices to make Art available in a click.”


Kairos 2020 Chloe Austin [on monitor] with
The Second Shift: On Crumbs of Shadow 2020 Clare Gallagher
She is 2020 Chloe Austin
Glass Tower 2020 Graham Gingles

GTG presents ‘Not Alone’, a unique touring exhibition for our strange new world…


Inspired by a fragment of an old song, Golden Thread Gallery director Peter Richards had an idea for an entirely new kind of exhibition, one that could overcome the distances forced between artists and curators worldwide by the Covid-19 pandemic. Not Alone is an exhibition in a bottle, containing eight new works from some of the leading artists on this island: Graham Gingles, Joy Gerrard, Sharon Kelly, John Rainey, Chloe Austin, Ailbhe Greaney, Megan Doherty and Clare Gallagher. Each has created a piece of art tiny or portable enough to fit inside a glass bottle, yet powerful enough to convey vast philosophies, stories and ideas, and endless possibilities of interpretation.

Packed up, the exhibition will now be sent out into our strange new world to international curators who will each mount the exhibition/s in their own homes. Installing and arranging the works in their space as they see fit, they will each create a new configuration, new context and new connections for the exhibition.

They will then pack Not Alone back into its bottle, and send it on to the next destination. At this moment in time it is on its way to Bologna, Italy, where the first curator, Chiara Matteucci, is waiting.

And after that, it will go to Rome, and then Amsterdam, and then… to destinations as yet unknown. It may never return, but we will follow its journey around Europe and share each iteration of the exhibition online.

Read the full story of the inspiration for this unique exhibition for our times, including more information on the artists and the artworks, in the presentation below.


Media enquiries:

Mary Stevens, Exhibitions Officer, Golden Thread Gallery info@gtgallery.co.uk / 028 90 330920 / www.goldenthreadgallery.co.uk

GTG Director and curator Peter Richards is available for interview, as are the artists involved.

Notes to editors:
Golden Thread Gallery (GTG) has played an important role in the provision of contemporary visual art in Belfast and Northern Ireland since it was established in 2001. Our mission is to present quality and innovative artistic programmes that capture the diversity of contemporary arts practice, and which engage, educate, challenge and inspire. We strive to build and engage the widest possible audience for contemporary arts, extending the reach of the arts, nurturing a deep understanding and enjoyment of current visual arts practice within the broader community, while developing, supporting and promoting the work of contemporary Northern Irish artists and visual arts practice. The GTG is a recognised charity, and our core funders are the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Belfast City Council.

GTG awarded Art Fund Respond and Reimagine grant!

13/08/2020

The Golden Thread Gallery is delighted to announce that we have been awarded a grant through Art Fund’s Respond and Reimagine programme.

The grant will allow us not only to survive and re-open in these challenging circumstances, but to take a huge step forward in celebrating and protecting Northern Ireland’s legacy of contemporary visual art. The necessity of creating a permanent Collection here in Northern Ireland has been made even more clear to us through the Covid-19 crisis, which hit artists particularly hard. Building on our ten-year project of exhibitions and publications, ‘Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art’, which set out to create a useful historical context from which audiences and educators could engage with the stories of this place through the art of our time, we will now be able to establish the Golden Thread Collection with the highest standard of collection management systems and storage.

The Respond and Reimagine grant will also go towards the post Covid-19 adaptations required to re-open the Golden Thread Gallery safely, and to welcome back and rebuild our audiences, following almost six months of lockdown closure.

Art Fund’s Respond and Reimagine grants offer flexible and responsive funding designed to meet immediate challenges connected to the Covid-19 crisis and reimagine future ways of working. In the first round, 18 grants were given, from a total of 114 applications. Developed in consultation with museums and galleries, the grants meet needs in four priority areas of collections, audiences, digital, and workforce. They may also cover costs to support reopening, as well as encouraging creative and innovative projects as organisations look to reopen with fundamentally different operating models. Respond and Reimagine Grants will provide £1.5m in 2020 to support museums, galleries, historic houses, libraries and archives, and non-venue-based visual arts organisations, and is part of Art Fund’s £2m package of funding to support museums through crisis.

The deadline for the next round of Respond & Reimagine grants is 17 August 2020, and a final round will take place in the autumn.

The Board and Management of the Golden Thread Gallery would like to express our thanks to Art Fund for their generous support.

ENDS

Media enquiries:

Press Information

Saran McAvera, Deputy Director, Golden Thread Gallery

info@gtgallery.co.uk / 028 90 330920

Notes to editors:

Golden Thread Gallery

Golden Thread Gallery (GTG) has played an important role in the provision of contemporary visual art in Belfast and Northern Ireland since it was established in 2001. Our mission is to present quality and innovative artistic programmes that capture the diversity of contemporary arts practice, and which engage, educate, challenge and inspire. We strive to build and engage the widest possible audience for contemporary arts, extending the reach of the arts, nurturing a deep understanding and enjoyment of current visual arts practice within the broader community, while developing, supporting and promoting the work of contemporary Northern Irish artists and visual arts practice. The GTG is a recognised charity, and our core funders are the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Belfast City Council.

Art Fund

Art Fund is the national fundraising charity for art. It provides millions of pounds every year to help museums to acquire and share works of art across the UK, further the professional development of their curators, and inspire more people to visit and enjoy their public programmes. Art Fund is independently funded, supported by the 159,000 members who buy the National Art Pass, who enjoy free entry to over 240 museums, galleries and historic places, 50% off major exhibitions, and receive Art Quarterly magazine. Art Fund also supports museums through its annual prize, Art Fund Museum of the Year, which was won by St Fagan’s National Museum of History, Cardiff, in 2019, and through a range of digital platforms.

www.artfund.org

GTG Workshop: Origami Bear with Paul Mulgrew!


In today’s bear-illiant new workshop, artist Paul Mulgrew shows you how to design, draw, create and colour your very own smiling Origami Bear!

WHAT YOU NEED:

  • One square sheet of white paper. (Plus one extra scrap sheet to protect the table.)
  • Crayons: Brown, Red, Black.
  • One black marker.

Origami is the traditional Japanese art of creating mini-sculptures by folding a flat, square sheet of paper – no scissors or glue required. The crane is one of the most famous designs, and one of the oldest known books about origami from 1797, called Hiden senbazuru origata (The Secret of Folding 1,000 Paper Cranes), contains instructions for making 49 different kinds of crane.

But origami is still being taken to new levels by contemporary artists – like this incredible life-size elephant created by artist Sipho Mabona from a single sheet of paper!


Or these elaborate paper sculptures designed using computational origami created by Professor Jun Mitani.


So, you can see that once you master the basics with our Origami Bear, the potential for new ideas from a historic tradition is vast and exciting.

Have fun folding, and please send us pictures of your creations!


Funded by Community Foundation NI

GTG FLASHBACK: SPLATTERED!


In August 2008 the Golden Thread Gallery hosted a ground-breaking participatory art project called Splattered. The project showcased range of contemporary urban artforms, with events run by the Trans Urban Arts Academy and aimed to encourage innovative crossovers between street art and more established forms of contemporary visual culture.

Splattered was an ambitious project combining contemporary urban art forms such as graffiti, VJing and low-tech filmmaking, with the added attraction of a paint-bombing event that linked with an exhibition of new work by Carlos Llavata: an internationally renowned artist & explosives expert, known for using fireworks and other kinds of explosives to create artworks that reflect on the human condition and the tension that lies between creativity and destruction.

It was an unbelievable opportunity to paint bomb an art gallery and join forces with an international explosives expert / artist. Participants listened to the sound of paint splatter and the newest beats as they took turns exploding with Carlos!



Splattered included:

Bodyscapes – an exhibition of new work by Carlos Llavata (Spain) connecting audio-visual projections with live actions and dramatic undertones.

Graffiti – Filth & Duncan Ross with the Splat Pack transformed the walls of the Gallery using graffiti techniques.


And now… it’s your turn!


CREATE YOUR OWN SPLATTER ART AT HOME

There’s no getting around it, splatter art can be SUPER messy… but that’s part of the fun! So, you need to do a bit of preparation, and definitely ask a grown-up for permission and some help!

The very best way to do it is outside so you can spread your paper out on the ground. If you are inside, paint in a space that you can clean up easily – avoid anywhere with wallpaper or carpets – and wear an apron or old clothes.

The great thing about splatter is that you don’t even need a paintbrush… there are so many possibilities.

It’s really all about THE FLICK! If you’re indoors, use a smaller flick of your wrist. But if you’re outside, go big and use your arms!

You need:

  • Runny paint in pots (or cups or yoghurt cartons or bowls)
  • Paper (or cardboard or an old t-shirt or an unfolded cereal box)
  • A paintbrush (or a spoon or an old toothbrush)

Are you ready? Ok!

Dip your brush or spoon into the paint then FLICK your wrist to splatter the paint across the paper!

Keep splattering with different colours. Try splattering close to the paper, and then further away, for different effects.

Leave your picture lying flat until the paint is dry… unless you want to experiment and see what happens if you don’t!

SHARE YOUR SPLATTER ART WITH US! Email pictures to info@gtgallery.co.uk

Buon viaggio Chiara!


Last week we said farewell to our wonderful Erasmus trainee Chiara Matteucci, as she was finally able to return home to Bologna, Italy after being stranded in Belfast during lockdown. We already miss her so much!

The Covid-19 pandemic restrictions kicked in soon after Chiara’s placement at the GTG began. In the strangest of circumstances she quickly became an invaluable part of the team, taking a pivotal role in delivering our online programme. In addition to carrying out a huge and overdue reorganisation of our exhibition archive, Chiara is our Instagram guru!


We asked her to write about her time with us, and as always it’s great!


Something forever

By Chiara Matteucci

‘When I packed my clothes and I was ready to depart for my Erasmus + traineeship I wasn’t expecting that it would turn out in this way. Well, no one expected that the whole year 2020 would turn out this way, but, let me say, if you decide to go through a worldwide pandemic in a foreign country, far away from home (precisely 1416 miles), things are slightly amplified. I don’t blame anyone, there were a couple of opportunities to fly back home but I considered it safer to stay here in Belfast and keep going with my Erasmus traineeship at the Golden Thread Gallery.

So here we are, at the end of this unique experience, which has unfolded as the most useful experience I’ve ever had – and all the thanks go to the team in the Gallery who supported (and endured) me in these pandemic months. I can’t hide that I would have wanted to have a chance to explore Belfast better (I’m still wondering how drinking a pint of beer in a pub after work would be) instead of knowing only the route to the gallery and back home, which by the way I can do with my eyes closed now.  And, of course, I missed all the beauty of seeing how to install and de-install an exhibition, talking with the artists during the vernissages and dealing with feedback of the public which, if you work with contemporary artworks, can often be incredibly controversial.

But if there’s something that I learned from this lockdown is to focus on the good things (the famous saying “looking at the glass as half full” has always turned out to be right) and, after four months of smart working, even though I exposed myself to an emotional rollercoaster, I can definitely say that I couldn’t have learned more work-wise. Even in a small and open listener team such as the Golden Thread Gallery, there are fixed roles. But during this period things have changed because we all have been exposed to something new, unexpected for the team and for me.  Together, meeting after meeting (God bless Zoom), we have formulated a virtual response to the quarantine, trying to keep the Gallery alive against the uncertain and suspended reality created by the virus. 

I clearly remember what the director Peter told me during one of our conversations about the art system – “If we were in a normal situation, probably me and you would never have met” and this is true. Someone could negatively interpret this sentence but in my case, this is where is hidden my half-full glass: the lockdown gave me the possibility to work in a unique (albeit virtual) environment, to be actively involved in the creation of content and I couldn’t be happier.

PS: Something forever is the title of a 2000 exhibition by Ian Charlesworth and Eoghan McTigue that the Golden Thread Gallery hosted in its old venue on the Crumlin Road. Have a look at the online archive, I proudly re-organised it!’

June 2020, Bologna via Belfast


We cannot wait to watch Chiara’s career in the arts develop, we know there will be so much success ahead for her. And we look forward to welcoming her back to Belfast for a visit someday soon so she can explore our brilliant city… and we can finally buy her that well-deserved pint!

GTG Workshops: Easy Weaving with Simon Mills


Today’s online workshop by artist and photographer Simon Mills shows you how to do simple weaving using paper. Once you get the hang of the technique, you can create baskets, placemats, decorations or even very funky headwear!

With a little bit of help, this is an activity for all ages to enjoy.



Did you know that basket-weaving is one of the most ancient crafts in human history? Yet there are many artists using the technique today, such as basketry artist Ferne K. Jacobs or Anna and the Willow who weaves willow rods to create incredible life-size sculptures.

Huntress (c) Anna and the Willow

We’d love to see pictures of your woven creations! Send them to us at info@gtgallery.co.uk


GTG Workshops are funded by Community Foundation NI