Celebrating IWD at the GTG

Happy International Women’s Day! We are celebrating by looking back at some of the exceptional women artists who have exhibited at Golden Thread Gallery in the past. We’re proud to have ensured that 50% of our exhibitions over our history have been by women, and glad to play our part in the improving representation of female artists.

Our brilliant volunteers have written about a few selected women whose exhibitions here in Belfast at the GTG directly challenged sexism and patriarchal values. Starting with the extraordinary Barbara Hammer, as chosen by Katharine Paisley.

“Hammer is considered the foremost pioneer of queer feminist cinema. For over 40 years her work has been challenging the straight, male-dominated iconography of the female body and sexuality. Through her films, performances, photography and installations Hammer rejects the male definitions and representations of women in film and photography. She negates the male gaze and celebrates lesbian desire through the active participation of women, countering the passive roles afforded to them in traditional cinema. Other past works have explored queer histories, such as the biographies of the artists Hannah Hoch and Claude Cahun.

Barbara Hammer exhibited 3 film works in the Golden Thread in November 2018 as part of Outburst Queer Arts Festival, Dyketactics! (1974), No No Nooky TV (1987) and Bedtime Stories I, II, III (1988).”

The newest member of the GTG team, Chiara Matteuci, has written about two radical women we were thrilled to welcome to the GTG: Sarah Maple and Margaret Harrison.

“Margaret Harrison is an engaged artist, always in the forefront of addressing social concerns and political controversy. She’s one of the founders of the London Women’s Liberation Art Group and she’s probably best known for the closing of her exhibition in 1971 by the police due to her sexually charged works.

In 2015 the Golden Thread Gallery hosted Harrison’s first solo exhibition on the island of Ireland. We are them, they are us included several seminal works, created at various stages of her career, alongside a number of more recent pieces. This exhibition explored many of the themes common in Harrison’s work, like her concern with the property rights and land ownership, and the issues of gender inequality and the objectification of women in popular culture.

Harrison has always explored the transformations of our age, from the women’s labour within the installation Greenham Common (1989), where she recreates a portion of the perimeter fence from Greenham Common military base, to the consideration of female gender in the contemporary society. In Scents of Identity (1993) young, often ethic minority, cosmetics salesgirls are depicted in polished, glossy department store surroundings.

Meanwhile, in He’s Only a Bunny Boy (1971), she draws Hugh Hefner posing proactively in a corset, stockings and bunny ears.

This hilarious artwork was part of her first solo exhibition, the one which the police closed after only one day. Things have changed since then, but not the way Harrison question the world, always with humour and a rebel gaze. 

And speaking of rebels… Sarah Maple is a visual artist based in the UK. Her mixed identity (half Britannic and half Islamic) is one of the major themes investigated by the artist, always with a wonderful (for someone outrageous) spontaneity. She’s currently taking part at the exhibition “Don’t ask me where I’m from” at Aga Khan Toronto dedicated to migration.

Your Body (2007)

In 2014 her artworks were exhibited at the Golden Thread Gallery. God is a Feminist was a journey through Maple’s diverse, engaging, challenging and sometimes controversial practice.

Her artworks are very current and avant garde, especially those related to the subject of feminism: just have a look at the painting “Menstruate with pride” from 2010-11, and think about the current issue of the tampon tax! “

Menstruate With Pride (2010-11)

We’re looking forward to presenting our audiences with more outstanding exhibitions by women artists in 2020/21, including Joy Gerrard‘s first major solo exhibition in Belfast, ‘A Crowd Exists’, coming up in May.

Where am I in the photo? Call for Photographic Submissions

As part of Belfast Arts Weekender, Golden Thread Gallery and Belfast Photo Festival presents Where am I in the photo? a collaborative exhibition and online platform that celebrated Belfast and it’s people. Contribute to the project by sharing your own iconic photographs and offer your unique, personal perspective on the city you love.

A selection of images submitted will be exhibited in Belfast city centre during the Belfast Arts Weekender.

for details go to https://www.whereamiinthephoto.co.uk/

#whereamIinthephoto?

PROCESSIONS – Mass Participation Artwork

 

The Golden Thread Gallery is delighted to announce our support for PROCESSIONS, a mass participation artwork to mark the centenary of the Representation of the People Act, which gave the first British women the right to vote.

PROCESSIONS is produced by Artichoke, the UK’s largest producer of art in the public realm, as part of 14-18 NOW, the UK’s official arts programme for the First World War centenary.

PROCESSIONS will invite women and girls across the UK to come togetheron the streets of Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh and London on Sunday 10 June 2018 to mark this historic moment in a living, moving portrait of women in the 21st century.

The Golden Thread Gallery is one of 100 organisations working with women artists up and down the country in the lead-up to the event, as part of an extensive public programme of creative workshops to create 100 centenary banners which will form part of this vast artwork.

The banner-making workshops we will be doing with Lesley Cherry and Kilcooey Women’s Group will focus on text and textiles, echoing the practices of the women’s suffrage campaign and will be spaces to consider the power of the vote today and our shared future. The banners made will represent and celebrate the diverse voices of women and girls from different backgrounds.

PROCESSIONS is commissioned by 14-18 NOW and produced by Artichoke. With support from the National Lottery through Arts Council England and the Heritage Lottery Fund, and from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Image credit: Photo of Emmeline Pankhurst courtesy of The Women’s Library @ LSE. Image design by Grey London

Clay Play – A Parent and Child Workshop

Join us at the GTG for a delightfully messy parent and child workshop that will have both you and your children leaving with some fancy new creations! View our latest exhibition ‘Quotidian Tensions between the Domestic and the Unexpected’ with your little ones and base your own creations off the ceramic cutlery, plates, bowls and figurines the artist has created. Each participant is welcome to make as much or as little as they please and can bring home everything they make. This event will run on the 3rd and 17th of February.

Free tea and coffee available for the adults, juice and snacks available for the kids.
Baby changing Facilities
Breastfeeding Friendly Venue

To book in please email info@gtgallery.co.uk with the number of adults and children attending.

Presentation by DAS Residency Award Winners 2016

Date: 15/12/16

Join us for a christmas tipple while captureresidents present a brief overview of their eclectic thoughts and outputs.

Shane Finan is a visual artist working in painting, installation and interactive media. He takes art seriously so he doesn’t have to take life seriously.

Will McConnell is a visual artist working in video, the majority of which is re-appropriated from Google and YouTube. His focus is on the relationship between technology & the human experience, daydreaming, space (physical & virtual), out-of-body experiences and states of being.

Dan Moxham is a multimedia artist working mostly with sound and video. He is interested in lo-fi techniques and processes, making short B-movie styled films, music videos and pseudo-advertisements.

Kathleen O’Leary’s multidisciplinary practice involves creating and developing a particular goal towards inclusion and participation within an artistic and research context.